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It’s funny, when I read Will’s post this morning, I happened to be wearing my own variant of the outfit he’s writing about, namely:

  • cotton blue herringbone L.B.M. 1911 blazer
  • heather grey Kent Wang Polo
  • Dockers Alpha khaki
  • Chocolate suede chukkas

In fact, that’s what I’m moving toward for my personal uniform. Here in Northern California, especially in the city I live in, I think it strikes the balance between dressing well and dressing in context.

dieworkwear: “The California Tuxedo”:

I don’t really do “reblogs,” but this post at A Suitable Wardrobe was inspirational enough that I felt like I should. I’ve been thinking a lot about summer, and Luca Cordero di Montezemolo here looks great. Will writes:

“Lightweight blazer, chambray shirt, chinos and a pair of Sloops. That is the proper version of the California tuxedo, worn in the photo by Luca Cordero di Montezemolo. An ensemble for casual days in the spring sunshine, it is perhaps appropriate at the track (autos, not horses) as well as certain wineries and smaller towns where there are no neckties within a minimum of twenty miles. The blazer should be single breasted, and patch pocketed, and the shirt ideally a white or blue buttondown with the collar left flapping.”

I really want a pair of Sloops or that Brooks Bros. tie loafer



Hat tip to evolvingstyle for introducing me to this thread. Click through to his post for a very useful index of the relevant contributions.

evolvingstyle:

Can you tell the difference in formality among the three pics at the top? If not, then I cannot recommend enough a recent Style Forum thread titled ‘Practical Thoughts on Coherent Combinations for Beginners.’

I’ve learned as much reading this post over the past couple of weeks as I did in the previous year of learning about #menswear. The primary posts are written by SF stalwart F. Corbera. As it currently stands, at more than 25 pages of posts, the thread is a bit of a slog and includes a fair share of SF in-jokes and sniping between various other members, among some valuable commentary and informative dissent. You’ll find links to each of the substantive posts at the end of my post. The series is not done, but I’m enjoying it so much, I had to share.

Well said.
bowtiedandstarryeyed:

When it all comes down to it, it’s so easy to dress well. Take the guy here for example.
1. Start off with a well-tailored jacket. Multiple tweeds and a blue blazer will do you well. The brand really doesn’t matter so much as the fit, and some money well spent at a tailor can fix an ill fitting jacket.
2. Crisp blue and white shirts go with everything and can be worn casually or formally if you know what you’re doing.
3. A navy cashmere sweater will get you through 3 months out of the year comfortably and summer depending on where you live.
4. A pair of grey flannel pants will go with everything listed above in any number of combinations. By changing your jacket and shirt you can wear the same pair of pants or similar pairs day after day. Many underestimate the importance of investing in a good pair of pants, but it pays off. Trade in the flannels for a pair of khakis on the weekend.
5. Lastly, invest in a pair of cordovan loafers. Alden’s LHS (or luxury handsewn) penny loafer is one of their most versatile models because it can be worn once again as a business shoe or as a casual one. Look to Michael Bastian who wears that exact model with t-shirts as much as he wears them with dress shirts.
When you put all of this together you get quite the sharp-dressed man….
but of course you knew all of this beforehand.

Well said.

bowtiedandstarryeyed:

When it all comes down to it, it’s so easy to dress well. Take the guy here for example.

1. Start off with a well-tailored jacket. Multiple tweeds and a blue blazer will do you well. The brand really doesn’t matter so much as the fit, and some money well spent at a tailor can fix an ill fitting jacket.

2. Crisp blue and white shirts go with everything and can be worn casually or formally if you know what you’re doing.

3. A navy cashmere sweater will get you through 3 months out of the year comfortably and summer depending on where you live.

4. A pair of grey flannel pants will go with everything listed above in any number of combinations. By changing your jacket and shirt you can wear the same pair of pants or similar pairs day after day. Many underestimate the importance of investing in a good pair of pants, but it pays off. Trade in the flannels for a pair of khakis on the weekend.

5. Lastly, invest in a pair of cordovan loafers. Alden’s LHS (or luxury handsewn) penny loafer is one of their most versatile models because it can be worn once again as a business shoe or as a casual one. Look to Michael Bastian who wears that exact model with t-shirts as much as he wears them with dress shirts.

When you put all of this together you get quite the sharp-dressed man….

but of course you knew all of this beforehand.

13th & Wolf’s Essentials

tredicielupo:

If I was up to me, the following would be standard issue for any guy looking to dress like an adult:

1. Navy blazer (hip patch pockets, barchetta breast pocket, side vents).

2. Charcoal Flannel suit (hip flap pockets and barchetta breast pocket, side vents).  Works well in any situation and the pants can easily be worn with the above blazer.

3. 1 white shirt, 1 blue shirt, 3 blue/white striped shirts.  Semi-spread to spread collar with barrel cuffs.  OCBDs can come later and straight point collars have no place in a well dressed man’s wardrobe IMO.

4. Brown and black calf captoes.  Real deal business shoes, particularly for your profession.  Crockett & Jones makes some beautiful ones for Brooks Brothers.

5. Snuff suede chukka boots.  The perfect in between shoe - works well casually but very elegant with a suit or odd jacket.

I could go much deeper but that’s a good place to begin.

abitofcolor:

My 10 Wardrobe Essentials
I wear some combination of these on most days. They are truely my essentials. What are yours?
1) Blue Blazer- this one is a cashmere herringbone from Napoli Su Misura
2) White Oxford Cloth Button Down shirt - Brooks Brothers
3) End on end blue spread collar shirt- My Tailor
4) Grey wool flannels - Salvatore Ambrosi
5) Levis - 1947 LVC 501XX
6) White linen pocket square - A Suitable Wardrobe
7) Croc Belt - Polo Ralph Lauren
8) Silk Knit Tie - Luciano Barbera
9) Navy Crew Neck Cashmere Sweater- Borrelli
10) Suede Cap Toe - Crocket & Jones

abitofcolor:

My 10 Wardrobe Essentials

I wear some combination of these on most days. They are truely my essentials. What are yours?

1) Blue Blazer- this one is a cashmere herringbone from Napoli Su Misura

2) White Oxford Cloth Button Down shirt - Brooks Brothers

3) End on end blue spread collar shirt- My Tailor

4) Grey wool flannels - Salvatore Ambrosi

5) Levis - 1947 LVC 501XX

6) White linen pocket square - A Suitable Wardrobe

7) Croc Belt - Polo Ralph Lauren

8) Silk Knit Tie - Luciano Barbera

9) Navy Crew Neck Cashmere Sweater- Borrelli

10) Suede Cap Toe - Crocket & Jones

howtotalktogirlsatparties:

lnsee:

A versatile wardrobe:
For Digital rev, I needed to select a few items that would be good for him to switch around and look fresh without repeating outfits too many times.  In other words, start his classic menswear wardrobe.  The pieces that I ended up picking for him were:
1 Blue Blazer (more on the casual side to suit w/ Kai’s style)1 Gray BlazerRing Jacket Cotton Drill ChinosGray TrousersNavy (Armoury) TieBrown Loafers 
The idea was to give him a list of basic color items that he could pick out at random and still look right. This also happens to be the starter wardrobe I would recommend to people to get if you’re looking at something on the smart casual side.  The only other few items I would add to a more formal wardrobe would of course be the Navy and Gray suits!

Read.

howtotalktogirlsatparties:

lnsee:

A versatile wardrobe:

For Digital rev, I needed to select a few items that would be good for him to switch around and look fresh without repeating outfits too many times.  In other words, start his classic menswear wardrobe.  The pieces that I ended up picking for him were:

1 Blue Blazer (more on the casual side to suit w/ Kai’s style)
1 Gray Blazer
Ring Jacket Cotton Drill Chinos
Gray Trousers
Navy (Armoury) Tie
Brown Loafers 

The idea was to give him a list of basic color items that he could pick out at random and still look right. This also happens to be the starter wardrobe I would recommend to people to get if you’re looking at something on the smart casual side.  The only other few items I would add to a more formal wardrobe would of course be the Navy and Gray suits!

Read.

One must know the rules first, even if you are going to break them. Your pocket square should never match your tie. Ever. It should contrast and complement in colour, pattern and texture. Only wear one tie accessory. Do not wear a collar bar and tie pin. And avoid wearing a tie bar with your waistcoat; it is superfluous, rather like wearing ‘belt and braces’. However, you can still wear cufflinks with your shirt; they should be in the same metal but need not match perfectly. The breast pocket on your suit jacket should always hold a pocket square, with hand-rolled edges and of a decent size so that it overflows from your chest. Always wear a pocket square, even when you do not wear a tie.

Edward Sexton (via putthison)
Adding this to my essentials collection, but remember to keep this in context. There’s no need to own that many suits if they’re not required at your workplace. Kiyoshi suggests a few alternatives.
Also, keep geography and climate in mind and adjust accordingly.
mostexerent:

Print out & keep on you at all times - This is a great foundation manifesto..
(via Look Indispensable | Five Ways To | The Journal | MR PORTER)

Adding this to my essentials collection, but remember to keep this in context. There’s no need to own that many suits if they’re not required at your workplace. Kiyoshi suggests a few alternatives.

Also, keep geography and climate in mind and adjust accordingly.

mostexerent:

Print out & keep on you at all times This is a great foundation manifesto..

(via Look Indispensable | Five Ways To | The Journal | MR PORTER)

The Grey Suit
Ethan starts off his second essay on the essential wardrobe by challenging your definition of “essential:”

To try to define what “men” should be wearing this season is like saying that “dishes” need more salt this season. For anyone reading this - look to yourself and your day to day. Make decisions on how you dress according to what you do. If what you are wearing is uncomfortable or impractical for you, then you’re in a costume, and how can you function and be your best in a costume?

Much more here.

The Grey Suit

Ethan starts off his second essay on the essential wardrobe by challenging your definition of “essential:”

To try to define what “men” should be wearing this season is like saying that “dishes” need more salt this season. For anyone reading this - look to yourself and your day to day. Make decisions on how you dress according to what you do. If what you are wearing is uncomfortable or impractical for you, then you’re in a costume, and how can you function and be your best in a costume?

Much more here.


My last question was brought on by this fantastic post on James Bond’s suits over on Men’s Flair.
A guest post by Matt Spaiser of The Suits of James Bond, it takes the essence of an earlier article he wrote for Clothes on Film (also excellent) and expands the scope to cover every Bond incarnation. While this necessarily means he doesn’t go into quite the same in-depth detail that he does in the Clothes on Film post, by taking on the whole franchise Spaiser underscores the attributes of 007’s wardrobe that transcend time and fashion.
In other words, he presents the keys to a wardrobe that can be called both “essential” and “timeless.”
Some highlights, starting with the most important attribute of a suit:

When Roger Moore took over Bond his suits were the same in overall style [as Connery’s], and as the 70s progressed, his lapels, pocket flaps and trousers widened. These are what the average person notices about 1970s suits, but if you look past that you will find that Roger Moore always wears perfectly tailored suit. No matter how you style a suit, a proper fit is always most important.

On Daniel Craig wearing Tom Ford:

Tom Ford is the most fashionable suit brand Bond has ever worn, but its English-influenced style is rather appropriate for Bond. The Tom Ford suits are cut with strong shoulders, a clean chest and a 3-button front that rolls to the middle button, essentially giving the jackets a 2-button silhouette. The jackets all have double vents and ticket pockets. Though Tom Ford suits have a striking silhouette, they are firmly rooted in classic style.

On essential shirts:

Most of Bond’s shirts throughout the series are cotton poplin in solid white, light blue or cream. These three shirts go with everything and are all the well-dressed man needs. … Shirts should be somewhat fitted but never tight.

And essential ties:

Connery started the series with only one tie, a navy blue grenadine. … Later, Connery expanded to wearing black, navy and brown knit ties and black and brown grenadine ties. Connery’s Bond showed how it’s possible to dress with with such a limited tie collection, which is often the case for travelling businessmen. … Perhaps the best argument for solid ties is that they never go out of style. Avoid loud, busy ties like many worn by Pierce Brosnan, as those all look dated now. Daniel Craig opts for simple woven macclesfield ties, understated and formal.

For much more insight, read the whole article.

My last question was brought on by this fantastic post on James Bond’s suits over on Men’s Flair.

A guest post by Matt Spaiser of The Suits of James Bond, it takes the essence of an earlier article he wrote for Clothes on Film (also excellent) and expands the scope to cover every Bond incarnation. While this necessarily means he doesn’t go into quite the same in-depth detail that he does in the Clothes on Film post, by taking on the whole franchise Spaiser underscores the attributes of 007’s wardrobe that transcend time and fashion.

In other words, he presents the keys to a wardrobe that can be called both “essential” and “timeless.”

Some highlights, starting with the most important attribute of a suit:

When Roger Moore took over Bond his suits were the same in overall style [as Connery’s], and as the 70s progressed, his lapels, pocket flaps and trousers widened. These are what the average person notices about 1970s suits, but if you look past that you will find that Roger Moore always wears perfectly tailored suit. No matter how you style a suit, a proper fit is always most important.

On Daniel Craig wearing Tom Ford:

Tom Ford is the most fashionable suit brand Bond has ever worn, but its English-influenced style is rather appropriate for Bond. The Tom Ford suits are cut with strong shoulders, a clean chest and a 3-button front that rolls to the middle button, essentially giving the jackets a 2-button silhouette. The jackets all have double vents and ticket pockets. Though Tom Ford suits have a striking silhouette, they are firmly rooted in classic style.

On essential shirts:

Most of Bond’s shirts throughout the series are cotton poplin in solid white, light blue or cream. These three shirts go with everything and are all the well-dressed man needs. … Shirts should be somewhat fitted but never tight.

And essential ties:

Connery started the series with only one tie, a navy blue grenadine. … Later, Connery expanded to wearing black, navy and brown knit ties and black and brown grenadine ties. Connery’s Bond showed how it’s possible to dress with with such a limited tie collection, which is often the case for travelling businessmen. … Perhaps the best argument for solid ties is that they never go out of style. Avoid loud, busy ties like many worn by Pierce Brosnan, as those all look dated now. Daniel Craig opts for simple woven macclesfield ties, understated and formal.

For much more insight, read the whole article.

Also tagging this.

putthison:

Five Casual Trousers for Fall

Though I love wearing my 3sixteens, I think it’s odd how many men wear only jeans, and nothing else. Granted, jeans are universally accepted, easy to wear, and very durable, but only wearing jeans seems very limiting. Expand your horizons this fall and consider these other casual trouser options. 

  1. Wool flannels are some of the best trousers you can buy. The material has a soft nap and a beautiful, varying color. They’re as comfortable as pajamas, but look very sharp at the same time. The best thing, however, is that while they work best for fall, you can wear them just as easily in the winter and spring. I recommend getting a few pairs, especially in various shades of grey. 
  2. Corduroys are another fall staple. The ribs on corduroy are known as wales, and they can range from seven per inch (jumbo cords) to sixteen (needlecords or pinwale cords). Generally speaking, the more wales, the lighter the cloth and youthful the look. If you don’t already have a pair, get them in dark brown. 
  3. Moleskins should be your next purchase. Like corduroys, they’re a hardwearing, brushed cotton fabric that has a bit of a velvety hand. Unlike cords, however, they don’t have wales. I like mine in olive, tan, and charcoal, but you can get them in any autumnal color, really. 
  4. Whipcords and cavalry twills are essentially the same thing, though cavalry twill has a slightly crispier, shinier finish. These are steeply angled twills, made from either cotton or wool, and often made for very hardwearing environments.  Get them in various shades of grey or a dark brown. 
  5. Lastly, I recommend just aiming for heavier weight wools and cashmeres. Anything but gabardine will be fine, which is what’s used for suits. I like mine to have a wooly, fuzzy hand. You can get them in a solid color, but don’t neglect the possibilities of patterns such as windowpane, herringbone, glen plaid, and houndstooth. 

For all the options above, I strongly suggest you get them cuffed. In my opinion, casual trousers in the fall and winter always look better cuffed, and this becomes doubly true when you wear boots. If you decide to get cuffs, get them made proportional to your height. The current trend is for large cuffs: I find that a man of average height looks best with a 2” cuff, while men of shorter stature look best with 1.5”.